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20120901
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
's speakers, building on the momentum of last night. how can you top michelle obama? >> believe it or not, when we were first married, our combined monthly student loan bill was actually higher than our mortgage. yeah. we were so young, so in love, and so in debt. and that's why barack has fought so hard to increase student aid and keep interest rates down. because he wants every young person to fulfill their promise and be able to attend college without a mountain of debt. so in the end, for barack, these issues aren't political. they're personal. because barack knows what it means when a family struggles. he knows what it means to want something more for your kids and grandkids. barack knows the american dream because he's lived it. and he wants everyone in this country, everyone, to have the same opportunity. he reminds me that we are playing a long game here. and that change is hard. and change is slow. and it never happens all at once. but eventually, we get there. we always do. we get there because of folks like my dad. folks like barack's grandmother. men and women who said to them
speech for michelle obama. big show for you this morning. we're going to be talking to chicago's mayor and former white house chief of staff rahm emanuel. robert gibbs, the former white house spokesman turned campaign adviser is with us. san antonio mayor julian castro and along with his twin brother, texas state rep joaquin castro and the actor john leguizamo is with us. "starting point" begins right now. welcome, everybody, our team with us this morning, dana bash, senior congressional correspondent and danle malloy and ryan liz za, the washington correspondent for the new yorker. how are you holding up, ryan? yeah, both of us, holding up. our "starting point" this morning is hail to the mom in chief as we heard michelle obama say. first lady firing up the delegates on the first night of the democratic national convention, rousing speech that was political and also very personal. another headliner was the san antonio mayor julian castro, one of the party's rising stars. he's the first latino to ever deliver a democratic keynote address. you see him hugging his twin brother. they look
, the first lady, michelle obama, perhaps the president's secret weapon, making, what, 11 visits to north carolina since 2009? talk about mrs. obama's appeal there. >> well, she has stressed military families and helping them and, of course, north carolina has a very strong military presence with fort bragg and camp lejeune, the marine base. so military issues are very important. it's a way -- she's much more popular than her husband is here, and it's a way to portray herself and to portray, sell the obama administration in a very nonpartisan way because it has broad support, it goes across party lines, of course. arthel: and then, rob, you mentioned that 2008 election. of course, the obama/biden ticket getting 49.70% of the votes there, the mccain/palin ticket, 9.48. so close -- 39.48. so close. so i ask you, what is it about the politics of north carolina that makes it such an enigma? >> well, there's a couple things going on here. first of all, it's a upper-tier southern state, it's much more like virginia than a deep south state, so it's always been much more moderate. we've had 20 ye
'm not surprised at all because i've gotten to know her. she's fantastic. i also think michelle obama did a very good job. there were a lot of very good jobs, but i think the democrats had more appropriate people to the party than the republicans did. >> steve: there was also bill clinton who gave a great if not very long speech on behalf of the current president. >> he did. >> steve: the day after the president gave his speech, donald, and by all accounts, the president flat in comparison to some of the soaring rhetoric that we've heard in the past, the day after, out pops the jobs number and it just couldn't be worse for the white house.6,000d 368,000 people left the hunt for jobs. for every job created, four people dropped out. the economic news couldn't get worse for the president. >> right. it was a bad report. it was a very bad report, was not covered as badly and as -- the way it should have been, but frankly, i'm listening to made in america or made in the usa, regardless of what he's saying, why isn't he doing something about china? he never attacks china. he's not stopping the problem
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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